Fantasy Sports Widow Survival Guide

By Anessa Gross

It’s that crazy time of year where many professional sports tend to overlap. Football, basketball, and hockey are all about to begin and the baseball season is coming to a close. It’s no surprise that this is the time of year where women tend to lose their men to sports. Simply watching games has become a thing of the past, and playing fantasy sports has taken over. Playing in a fantasy sports league can range in costs from a few dollars to an excess of $10,000 to join. Obviously this can attract a range of fans from all different walks of life. Spending money gambling on fantasy sports can put a strain on a family budget, but here are some budget-friendly survival tips for the fantasy sports widows to balance your spending:

  • Find another past time that interests you. Just because your husband or boyfriend is spending their spare time with their fantasy league that doesn’t mean you have to sit on the couch and twiddle your thumbs waiting for them. Get out there and do something! Not all past times are costly either. Try running or riding a bike. Not only will this pass the time but you’ll get great health benefits. Better health always equals more savings for you!
  • Create your own group. Your significant other isn’t on a league by themselves, which means there are probably others out there just like you. Arrange a girl’s night on the same nights as the games. Entertainment like movies, books, baking, wine tasting, board games, or just talking with friends can be budget-friendly ways to occupy your free time.
  • Get involved. The best way to avoid being a fantasy sports widow is to get involved. Ask your significant other to explain the rules to you. Try following along and don’t be afraid to ask questions. They may appreciate that you are taking the time to learn about something they are interested in.

No matter what you decide to do with this newfound freedom, be sure to look at the bright side. Take this opportunity to discover something new about yourself and possibly find something you really love to do. It might be even better for your relationship in the long run.

About the Author

The preceding is a post from Anessa Gross, a Certified Personal Finance Counselor who graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication from the University of Central Florida. She is also a current graduate student at the Huizenga Business School at Nova Southeastern University.